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#1 The Morning Breaks

The premier hymn in this collection is a bold declaration of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, which promises light to a world in spiritual darkness. Included in the download are two versions. First, an accompaniment for the final verse, and second, a modified version that harmonizes the unique tenor/bass and treble duet phrases.

#1 The Morning Breaks - Mike Carson
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#2 The Spirit of God

"Because it is so closely tied with important events in Church history, and because it is part of such joyful occasions as temple dedications in our own day, "The Spirit of God" is one of the most significant and beloved hymns in the hymn tradition of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It truly affords an opportunity to sing and shout "with the armies of heaven." Karen Lynn Davidson

The pedal line in this hymnbellishment encourages a forward, marching movement, which aptly reflects the spirit of this hymn.

#2 The Spirit of God - Mike Carson
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#3 Now Let Us Rejoice - Mike Carson
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#3 Now Let Us Rejoice

"'Now Let Us Rejoice' came out of a grave situation in the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a situation in 1833 of defeat, frustration, homelessness, suffering, privation, and hunger. But even these hardships produced a hymn that still gives hope and sustenance to [millions] who live in better times." George D. Pyper

 

This hymnbellishment features harmonic changes that will be more effective if the accompanied verse is sung in unison. Use part of it for the introduction and/or all of it for the singing of the final verse. The long pedal points, walking pedal lines, and frequent harmonic changes are more effective with a broadened tempo.

 
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#5 High on the Mountain Top - Mike Carson
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#5 High on the Mountain Top

"And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the Lord's house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills: and all nations shall flow unto it" Isaiah 2:2.

This hymnbellishment can be used effectively with unison singing or with the traditional four-part harmonies. As with most last-verse accompaniments with long pedal points, walking pedal lines, and frequent harmonic changes, it is more effective to broaden the tempo a bit. With the download a second version is included that can be used as the introduction or for a different verse.

 
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#6 Redeemer of Israel - Mike Carson
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#6 Redeemer of Israel

"The six verses of this hymn affirm many facets of the Savior's mission and personality. The vigorous words praise the Savior first as our invincible redeemer, then as our shepherd and protector, then as the millenial Messiah. The sixth verse is an ecstatic vision of his heavenly glory" Karen Lynn Davidson.

​This setting can be used as an introduction to the hymn and as an accompaniment for the final verse. Too often music directors end before singing the prayerful fifth verse and the praising sixth verse, omitting references to the soul-cheering comfort and hope that the Savior imparts and the rejoicing of ten thousand angels, as myriads wait for His word!

 
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#9 Come, Rejoice

"Come, Rejoice" is a Christ-centered celebration of the restoration of the gospel. Jesus has spoken again in the latter days to gladden the hearts of his followers and gather them to him." Karen Lynn Davidson

The four-part version here is taken from the 1950 hymnal and expanded with harmonic and melodic movement at the phrase endings and a pedal point on the third line.

#9 Come, Rejoice! - Mike Carson
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#13 An Angel from on High

"'An Angel from on High' belongs distinctively to the hymnology of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is a song of the Restoration---a revelation of a divine truth...." George D. Pyper in Stories of Latter-day Saint Hymns

Written at the request of an organist friend, this hymnbellishment will elevate the singing of the final verse. Please consider singing all five verses!

#13 An Angel from on High - Mike Carson
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#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet.

#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet

"It cannot be called the greatest hymn ever written.... In fact, it does not compare in literary merit or poetic beauty with many of the other gems contained in our hymn books; but...it is exclusively a Latter-day Saint hymn; a Mormon heart-throb; a song of the Restoration" George D. Pyper.

​This is a reharmonization for unison singing on the last verse. The organist may play the last two lines as an "interlude" as a way of slowing down the tempo in preparation for a broader, more deliberate tempo for the last verse. 

#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet - Mike Carson
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#21 Come, Listen to a Prophet's Voice

This little hymnbellishment can be used at the end of the introduction for a more interesting harmony to the otherwise mundane repeated notes. Also use it at the end of the fourth verse for the same reason and to end the hymn with a feeling of completion and resolve.

#21 Come, Listen to a Prophet's Voice - Mike Carson
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#25 Now We'll Sing with One Accord

The events referred to in this hymn---the restoration of the gospel, the receiving of the priesthood, and the translation of the Book of Mormon---honor the Prophet Joseph Smith.

This accompaniment was written to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Prophet's First Vision in the spring of 1820.

#25 Now We'll Sing with One Accord - Mike Carson
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#26 Joseph Smith's First Prayer

This hymn depicts the First Vision of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It provides the essential facts of the moving account of the events leading up to and including the vision of the Father and the Son. 

This setting can be used as an introduction and/or an accompaniment to the singing of the hymn, being especially effective on the final verse to provide an audible impression of the remarkable words spoken by the Father: "Joseph, this is my Beloved; hear Him."

#26 Joseph Smith's First Prayer - Mike Carson
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#27 Praise to the Man - Mike Carson
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#27 Praise to the Man

"Soon after the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, William W. Phelps, in an expression of grief and admiration for his close associate who had been so cruelly martyred, wrote "Praise to the Man." The words he penned as a personal tribute reflect the feelings of millions of Saints" Karen Lynn Davidson.

​This setting provides an introduction, interlude, and final-verse accompaniment, which allows for four-part singing and the option of soloing out the tenor line, preferably on a bright reed combination. The introduction mimics the sound of Scottish bagpipes.

 
 
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#36 They, the Builders of the Nation

"This hymn highlights the role of the pioneers as an example and a model for those who followed them. Their deeds not only tamed the wilderness and built cities but also provided 'stepping-stones for generations,' a path for their children and grandchildren to admire and follow..." Karen Lynn Davidson

Simple, yet effective. Useful as a final verse accompaniment, sung in unison. If the organist plays from the hymnal and then reverts to the hymnbellishment on the third line, it can be sung in harmony.

#36 They, the Builders of the Nation - Mike Carson
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#41 Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise

This setting can be used with good effect for the last verse of the hymn. The five unison notes at the beginning of the first, second, and fourth lines are harmonized, and the pedal point on the third line creates a sense of urgency to return to the tonic. All in all it will elevate the message and edify the singers as they sing this glorious hymn.

#41 Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise - Mike Carson
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#44 Beautiful Zion, Built Above

In collaboration with Rebecca Brand, we have created an accompaniment for the final verse of this very singable and well-loved gospel-style hymn. It can be used with good effect to elevate the message and edify the congregation.

#44 Beautiful Zion, Built Above - Mike Carson
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#58 Come, Ye Children of the Lord

Considered by many to be of highest exaltation and musical worship, this hymn contemplates the events of the Savior's second coming and the anticipation of that day when we will shout and sing in celebration of the time of love and beauty, when earth is cleansed from sin.

This setting is to be used as a last-verse accompaniment with full organ.

#58 Come, Ye Children of the Lord - Mike Carson
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#59 Come, O Thou King of Kings

This vigorous millennial hymn text by Parley P. Pratt is a fervent cry to the God of Israel to come and set His people free. No doubt written during a time of great trials for the early Saints, it looked to the day when all the ransomed throng would join in singing a new triumphant song, filling the heavens with anthems from Zion's Hill.

With the steady stepwise motion of the pedal and the added harmonic and rhythmic movement between the phrases, this setting can give the last verse an edifying lift.

#59 Come, O Thou King of Kings - Mike Carson
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#60 Battle Hymn of the Republic.png

#60 Battle Hymn of the Republic

The words to this famous hymn link patriotic heroism with the heroism of our Savior and Redeemer, Jesus Christ. It points toward a jubilant millennial return of the Lord.

Use this joyful hymnbellishment as an accompaniment to the singing of the second verse ("He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat") and the last chorus—resolutely!

#60 Battle Hymn of the Republic - Mike Carson
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#62 All Creatures of Our God and King

This magnificent hymn should be led with close adherence to the tempo suggestions, allowing the congregation adequate breath to sing the phrases exultantly, particularly the last "Alleluia!"

This final-verse setting will add depth and gravity to unison or part singing. An introduction is also provided.

#62 All Creatures of Our God and King - Mike Carson
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#66 Rejoice, the Lord Is King!

Described by J. Spencer Cornwall as "heroic in character and . . . sequentially climactic" in melody and text, this hymn is an exultant celebration of the Savior's many names and attributes: Lord, King, Savior, Christ, and "the God of truth and love"!

This setting provides a harmonic background to the three small sections that are solely unison, and features long, low pedal points, which emphasize the triumphant text: "His kingdom cannot fail."

#66 Rejoice, the Lord Is King! - Mike Carson
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#67 Glory to God on High

This dignified hymn unites the praises of heaven and earth. It is a simple poetic adaptation of Revelation 5:9-13, wherein John the Revelator sees and hears "a new song:" Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. Use the hymnbellishment as a joyful introduction or accompaniment for the final verse. The tune name, ITALIAN HYMN, honors the nationality of the composer. First published in 1761, the tune is included in most Christian hymnals. It is perfect for the Easter season!

#67 Glory to God on High - Mike Carson
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#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty H
#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand - Mike Carson
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#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand

This stirring hymn praises the majesty of God and addresses Him in mighty prayer, pleading for His guidance and protection in preserving our nation. The text expresses patriotic feelings, but is appropriate for any occasion. The fourth verse, which is not printed in the Latter-day Saint hymnal, states:

Refresh thy people on their toilsome way,

Lead us from night to never-ending day;

Fill all our lives with love and grace divine,

And glory, laud, and praise be ever thine.

The opening fanfare is dramatically reharmonized, and, when sung with the omitted fourth verse, the marching bass line suggests a people being led and refreshed "on their toilsome way," reminiscent of the Pioneers. Singers can comfortably sing the four-part harmonies in the hymnal.

 
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#86 How Great Thou Art - Mike Carson
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#86 How Great Thou Art

This hymn was popularized by Billy Graham in his tours of Britain and North America in the 1950s. By 1974 it had become, according to a poll among readers of the Christian Herald magazine, the most popular hymn in America. In 1985 it appeared in Hymns of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Whenever I sang or played "How Great Thou Art" in a church service, I always felt it needed more movement in the accompaniment. Thus, this version for organ was born when it was chosen as a congregational hymn in a funeral for which I was asked to play.

I've also included a bonus setting in the download to use as an optional introduction or an alternate version for the refrain.

 
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#87 God Is Love - Mike Carson
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#87 God Is Love

This hymn's message is that the earth and its beauties and joys are a constant reminder of the goodness and love of the Creator. "The voice of His creations declares His divinity.... If [mankind] fails to converse with their Creator in plain words, at least they are obligated to hear the voice of Nature, which is also the voice of God" (Bruce R. McConkie).

This hymnbellishment is intended for accompanying unison congregational singing on the final verse. Beginning on the third staff the organ rises above the melody, so a strong director or choir should lead the way.

 
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#89 The Lord Is My Light - Mike Carson
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#89 The Lord Is My Light

"I've never liked this hymn," was a student's comment at a lesson to prepare this hymn for a sacrament service on the upcoming Sunday. I agreed that the value of "The Lord Is My Light" depends more on the significance of its message than on its musical worth. However, when the verses are sung at a slightly slower tempo to allow for all of the words to be sung comfortably, and then when the chorus's tempo is faster, it is much more enjoyable to sing! After I explained the tempo suggestions and wrote this hymnbellishment for her to use in the service, she admitted, "You're going to make me like this hymn now, aren't you?!"

 
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#92 For the Beauty of the Earth

This joyful hymn recalls to our minds the importance of being aware of the simple beauties of nature, family, and friendship. While naming many sources of joy, it gives us an opportunity to renew our appreciation for our blessings and to offer thanks to the Lord at the end of each verse.

This hymnbellishment provides an exuberant introduction to the singing of the hymn and an exciting accompaniment for the final verse.

#92 For the Beauty of the Earth - Mike Carson
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#93 Prayer of Thanksgiving

In America, "Prayer of Thanksgiving" (often known by its first line, "We gather together to ask the Lord's blessing") is a traditional Thanksgiving hymn. The tune, a Dutch folk melody, takes its name from a Viennese choirmaster named Edward Kremser, who published the melody in a collection of Dutch folk songs that he had arranged for male chorus. Karen Lynn Davidson

For congregational singing, use a bright, full chorus registration with a reed added to the pedal.

#93 Prayer of Thanksgiving - Mike Carson
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#94 Come, Ye Thankful People

During the Thanksgiving holiday season, the time when this hymn is usually sung, we reflect thoughtfully and joyfully upon our blessings. This hymn gives us an opportunity to recognize and praise the generous goodness of our Heavenly Father.

Again, as in hymn #93, use a bright, full chorus registration with a reed in the pedal for optimum effect in congregational singing.

#94 Come, Ye Thankful People - Mike Carson
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#98 I Need Thee Every Hour - Mike Carson
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#98 I Need Thee Every Hour

"This hymn strikes a meaningful chord among Latter-day Saints in its humble pleading for the constant presence of the Savior. In this hymn we petition Him repeatedly to be with us, not just in times of trial nor just on special spiritual occasions, but every hour" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This setting can be played ensemble style (both hands on the same manual) for every verse. The harmonies fit nicely with four-part singing. On the last verse the tenor line may be soloed out at pitch or an octave higher, depending on the solo registration that is chosen.

 
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#103 Precious Savior, Dear Redeemer

This hymn is especially powerful as an opening hymn in a worship service or as an invocation of the Spirit in a family or personal setting. The gentle, triple meter entreats calmness and serenity. The dotted rhythm should be slightly "relaxed" to aid in singing the peaceful prayer.

The setting here is for a second verse accompaniment in hymn singing or as a contrasting texture in a prelude.

#103 Precious Savior, Dear Redeemer - Mike Carson
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#106 God Speed the Right

Use this hymnbellishment as a last-verse accompaniment for unison singing to emphasize the steady, rhythmic tune and to express the patience, firmness, and perseverance that are ours as this hymn is sung. The unison voicing of the original is harmonized for strong effect. Use full organ with a 16' reed in the pedal. Enjoy!

#106 God Speed the Right - Mike Carson
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#116 Come, Follow Me

This Christ-centered hymn is a favorite of most Latter-day Saints. Its message is unique: If we emulate the Savior in this earthly life, we will have the opportunity to continue on the path of discipleship and acquire even more of His attributes in the life to come. If verse five is omitted, this thought is not complete. Verse six itemizes the gifts and blessings of obeying His words, "Come, follow me." Use this hymnbellishment to emphasize the grandeur of the final verse.

#116 Come, Follow Me - Mike Carson
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#117 Come unto Jesus

Jesus's invitation, "Come unto me," includes everyone who is burdened with cares or oppressed by sin. He made it open and free for all: the weak, the fearful, the hesitant. He beckons to those from every nation and isle, to the high and lowly in station. Ever he calls, "Come to me"!

This pastorale setting is useful as an introduction to the singing of the hymn, an accompaniment to one of the verses, or as an organ voluntary during the worship service.

#117 Come unto Jesus - Mike Carson
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#129 Where Can I Turn for Peace?

"The honest and touching words of this hymn can help in difficult moments---first, because they help us realize that all men and women experience such moments, and second, because they remind us of the ultimate source of comfort and solace." Karen Lynn Davidson

Written for a stake conference adult session, this hymnbellishment (or part of it) may be used to introduce the hymn, or, in its entirety, to accompany the last verse.

Where Can I Turn for Peace? - Mike Carson
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#130 Be Thou Humble

"The music and words of this tranquil hymn communicate beautifully the peace that comes with humble dependence on the Lord" (Karen Lynn Davidson). The promised blessings? Answered prayers, peace of mind, joy in service, and, ultimately, our return to our Father in heaven.

Use this hymnbellishment as the introduction to the singing of the hymn, an accompaniment for the singing of the second verse, or as part of a prelude or postlude.

#130 Be Thou Humble - Mike Carson
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#131 More Holiness Give Me - Mike Carson
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#131 More Holiness Give Me

Philip Paul Bliss was a popular writer of gospel songs. Several of his hymns have been included in various Latter-day Saint collections. The hymn text reviews Christian qualities of character of which the Savior himself is the source and example of these virtues. as indicated in the final line of the hymn: "More, Savior, like thee."

The setting here may be used as an organ voluntary or introduction to the hymn. It may also be used to accompany any of the verses without the singers needing to sing the melody in unison. The organist may solo out the tenor line in a higher register for good effect.

 
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#133 Father in Heaven

This is an excellent hymn of prayer for peace. It is especially powerful for patriotic occasions, with its third verse:

God of our fathers, strengthen ev'ry nation

In thy great peace where only is salvation.

So may the world its future spread before thee, Thus to adore thee.

A student requested this hymnbellishment, saying that she heard in her mind a walking pedal line, which provided the perfect setting for an exultant accompaniment for the last verse.

#133 Father in Heaven - Mike Carson
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#134 I Believe in Christ

The words of this hymn are the words of a servant of the Lord who spent his life speaking and writing about the Savior. The text is a grand and sweeping testimony of Jesus Christ. This powerful setting perfectly emphasizes the uplifting and positive nature of the words for the last verse. Select a full pleno registration, including mixtures, with a 16' reed added in the pedal.

#134 I Believe in Christ - Mike Carson
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#135 My Redeemer Lives.png
#135 My Redeemer Lives - Mike Carson
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#135 My Redeemer Lives

"In the most unequivocal language, this hymn declares the divinity and mission of Jesus Christ. The images of light, faith, and security that are used so effectively in the text are familiar to every Latter-day Saint" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This setting features a fanfare-like introduction to emphasize the declaration of the first phrase, "I know that my Redeemer lives"! The motivic phrases, which follow, require the music director to gesture a clear preparatory beat and entrance for the singers, as the organ introduction does not end with a "perfect cadence." The first verse should be sung in unison with this arrangement, and the proceeding verses may be sung in four-part harmony with the organ playing the same harmonies from the hymnal.

#136 I Know That My Redeemer Lives_0001.

#136 I Know That My Redeemer Lives

"To hear this loved song rendered by an assembly of devoted Latter-day Saints is a spiritual baptism. It becomes a mass-testimony of many of the truths of the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ" George D. Pyper.

​Use this hymnbellishment on the last verse with a strong organ registration to heighten the emotion and power of this hymn.

#136 I Know That My Redeemer Lives - Mike Carson
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#139 In Fasting We Approach Thee INTRO.p

#139 In Fasting We Approach Thee 

Former Tabernacle organist Clay Christiansen shares his feelings about creating this hymn tune: "Fasting is an act of humility done without show or fanfare. Such is the tune: humble, simple, without show or fanfare, but hopefully strong."

The setting here is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn.

#139 In Fasting We Approach Thee - Mike Carson
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#140 Did You Think to Pray? - Mike Carson
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#140 Did You Think to Pray?

"Most of us know from experience that even a few moments devoted to prayer in the morning can change our outlook for the better throughout the day. The greater the demands of the day, the greater seems to be our need for a private communication with the Lord. This hymn's message is a reminder of this important truth" Karen Lynn Davidson.

The setting here was written in the late 70's and may well be the first hymnbellishment I ever wrote! It is useful as an accompaniment for unison singing with a choir or congregation or as an organ prelude or offertory.

 
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#144 Secret Prayer

The words and music of this hymn were written by Hans Henry Petersen while he was director of the Hyrum (Utah) Stake choir around the turn of the century. He wished to make vivid the problems and difficulties of life that can be solved by prayer.

This setting is useful as a last-verse accompaniment for congregational singing or as part of a prelude before the service begins.

#144 Secret Prayer - Mike Carson
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#145 Prayer Is the Soul's Sincere Desire
#145 Prayer Is the Soul's Sincere Desire - Mike Carson
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#145 Prayer Is the Soul's Sincere Desire FUGHETTA

This hymn is "a collection of beautiful metaphors that describe prayer: hidden fire, a sigh, a falling tear, an upward glance, vital breath. The plain prose of the first line is as good a definition of prayer as one can find in short compass" (Albert Edward Bailey). It has the distinction of being the only hymn in the 1985 hymnal with eight numbered verses, the most of any other hymn. 

 

It is presented here as a fughetta, "a short fugue with exposition plus only a few restatements of the subject." It is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn.

 
 
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#147 Sweet Is the Work

"It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord, and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High: To show forth thy lovingkindness in the morning, and thy faithfulness every night" Psalm 92:1-2.

 

This hymnbellishment could be used effectively as a last-verse accompaniment for congregational singing. The singers may sing the four-part harmonization with this setting. 

#147 Sweet Is the Work - Mike Carson
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#150 O Thou Kind and Gracious Father FUG

#150 O Thou Kind and Gracious Father FUGHETTA

"O Thou Kind and Gracious Father" is presented here as a fughetta, "a short fugue with exposition plus only a few restatements of the subject." It is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn.

#150 O Thou Kind and Gracious Father FUGHETTA - Mike Carson
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#151 We Meet, Dear Lord FUGHETTA_0001.pn

#151 We Meet, Dear Lord FUGHETTA

"We Meet, Dear Lord" is presented here as a fughetta, "a short fugue with exposition plus only a few restatements of the subject." It is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn.

#151 We Meet, Dear Lord - Mike Carson
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#153 Lord, We Ask Thee Ere We Part

J. Spencer Cornwall called this hymn "well written, dignified, and enticingly singable." It is a prayer of benediction, asking that the teachings of the day take root in each member of the congregation so that all may grow in obedience, service, and holiness. Karen Lynn Davidson

Use this hymnbellishment to provide a prayerful yet powerful conclusion to the singing of this hymn.

#153 Lord, We Ask Thee Ere We Part - Mike Carson
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#157 Thy Spirit, Lord, Has Stirred Our S

#157 Thy Spirit, Lord, Has Stirred Our Souls

"This hymn is intended to be a grateful closing hymn after a rich outpouring of the 'glowing power' of the Lord has moved the souls of the listeners and filled them with new determination to carry on, or newborn resolutions to do better." J. Spencer Cornwall

Schreiner's masterful melody is an example of motivic unity—short melodic fragments repeated and altered. Both text and tune are elevated in structure and tone. It is a well-loved hymn among the saints.

#157 Thy Spirit, Lord, Has Stirred Our Souls - Mike Carson
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#158 Before Thee, Lord, I Bow My Head_00

#158 Before Thee, Lord, I Bow My Head

This hymn was originally included in the "choir" section of the 1950 hymnal, probably because of it's unique tenor/bass "answering measures," but it was quite popular with congregations as well. Use this setting as part of a prelude or postlude or to accompany the second verse for the singing of the hymn. It is especially effective if the melody is played an octave lower with a distinctive combination of stops. If you wish, you may tie the first two bass quarter notes in each measure.

#158 Before Thee, Lord, I Bow My Head - Mike Carson
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#163 Lord, Dismiss Us with Thy Blessing.

#163 Lord, Dismiss Us with Thy Blessing

The lovely text of this hymn is a verbal prayer, offering thanks and adoration for the "joyful sound" of the gospel in our lives. The text may be better appreciated when sung to an alternate tune such as #172 "In Humility, Our Savior," HYFRYDOL. The present tune is often criticized as "too simple" and "folkish." I suggest that the congregation be encouraged to sing the melody on both verses and that the organist play this hymnbellishment for both verses, brightening the registration for the second verse.

#163 Lord, Dismiss Us with Thy Blessing - Mike Carson
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#166 Abide with Me! - Mike Carson
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#166 Abide with Me!

One of the masterpieces of Christian hymn tradition, "Abide with Me!" is sometimes thought of as a hymn about the close of day; it is actually about the close of life. It is a prayer for the Lord's presence at the moment of trial, particularly at the moment of death. It is also an affirmation of belief in an afterlife and in the Lord's power to sustain and bless. Karen Lynn Davidson

With its swiftly moving eighth notes in the first measure of the second verse, this rendition expresses the sentiment, "Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day." The ensuing long phrases are connected by gentle passing and neighboring tones to encourage singers to express complete thoughts. For the third verse, the organist may play the soprano and alto parts an octave lower with the right hand on a prominent manual using the traditional voicing from the hymnal.

 
 
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#170 God, Our Father, Hear Us Pray - Mike Carson
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#170 God, Our Father, Hear Us Pray

This simple yet graceful prayer hymn requests the Lord's grace and approval as we partake of the emblems of the sacrament. Annie Pinnock Malin's poignant text asks for the Father's smile to shine upon us, for His spirit to linger near, for our faults to be pardoned, and for a blessing on our daily efforts.

This setting, if played in its entirety, will be successful as an introduction to the singing of the hymn or as an offertory after the singing while the bread is finished being broken.

 

NOTE: If playing this on manuals with no pedal, play the tenor "Bs" in measures 2 and 10 with the right hand; don't omit them! 

 
#171 With Humble Heart.png

#171 With Humble Heart

"With Humble Heart" is a reminder that the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper offers opportunities for spiritual renewal and growth "to be like Thee."

This setting provides a thoughtful introduction to the singing of the hymn, an accompaniment to unison singing, or a  prayerful organ voluntary.

#171 With Humble Heart - Mike Carson
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#172 In Humility, Our Savior

"This reverent hymn emphasizes both the blessings and duties of the covenant of the sacrament. In the form of a prayer, the hymn asks the Lord to bless us with sincere devotion and remembrance. It is also a gentle reminder that the Savior's sacrifice should call forth forgiveness and tolerance among his children" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This setting can be used effectively as a long introduction to the singing of the hymn, an accompaniment for the last verse, and as an offertory while the emblems of the sacrament are finished being prepared.

#172 In Humility, Our Savior - Mike Carson
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#173 While of These Emblems We Partake_0
Chorus-Style Version
#173 While of These Emblems We Partake (Chorus Style) - Mike Carson
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Solo-Style Version
#173 While of These Emblems We Partake (Solo Style) - Mike Carson
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#173 While of These Emblems We Partake

SAUL

"The words are outstanding in poetic beauty. The contemplation of such thoughts is a religious duty asked of Latter-day Saints at the time of partaking of the emblems of the Lord's supper" J. Spencer Cornwall.

Refer to the text in the hymnal and note the comma after "grave" at the end of the third verse. The sentence continues through to the fourth verse, assuring that it is "man" who will "rise triumphant from the tomb...freed from the power of death and pain, with Christ, the Lord, to rule and reign!" 

Two versions are offered here: the first in chorale style and the second in solo style, making either of them a solemn organ introduction to the singing of the hymn or an offertory while the emblems of the sacrament are finished being prepared.

 
 
 
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#174 While of These Emblems We Partake AEOLIAN

This hymnbellishment offers a solemn accompaniment for the second verse. The right hand plays an octave lower on the prominent manual, and the left hand plays the "tenor" on a solo manual. When played in this fashion, the setting depicts the dark phrases in the second verse: "the blood of Christ was shed," "for us on Calvary's cross He bled," "the awful gloom," and doom that creation would have brought without the Atonement of the Savior.

#174 While of These Emblems We Partake AEOLIAN - Mike Carson
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#175 O God, the Eternal Father.png

#175 O God, the Eternal Father

The tune of this worshipful hymn is the beautiful Mendelssohn melody, which was originally the setting for a poem titled "Farewell to the Forest."

This setting makes a reverent introduction to the singing of the hymn or can be played to accompany the singing of the last verse.

#175 O God, the Eternal Father - Mike Carson
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#176 'Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Lo
#176 'Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Love - Mike Carson
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#176 'Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Love MEREDITH

Fughetta

This hymn honors the holy sacrifice that we commemorate through the sacrament each week, but it also gives thanks for the ceremony of the sacrament itself: "Oh, blessed hour! communion sweet!" 

It is presented here as a fughetta, "a short fugue with exposition plus only a few restatements of the subject." It is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn.

 
#177 'Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Love - Mike Carson
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#177 'Tis Sweet to Sing the Matchless Love (HANCOCK)

This hymn honors the holy sacrifice that we commemorate through the sacrament each week, but it also gives thanks for the ceremony of the sacrament itself: "Oh, blessed hour! communion sweet!" Two tunes are offered in the 1985 Latter-day Saint hymnal. This tune, because of its gospel-song energy, has great appeal.

This setting features undulating counter-melodies in the alto and tenor lines that are created by using mostly whole-step neighboring and passing tones, thus allowing the singers to sing the four voice parts presented in the hymnal. The short, one-measure appearance of unison notes in the chorus are also harmonized for heightened effect.

 
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#178 O Lord of Hosts - Mike Carson
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#178 O Lord of Hosts

"The Savior's example of compassion and forgiveness should be ever in our minds, to help us live with one another in love and union. Particularly, as we prepare to take the sacrament, as we ask theLord to cleanse our hearts and prepare our minds, we should feel at one with our brothers and sisters. Such is the message of this peaceful, elegant sacrament hymn" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This setting provides three versions, which enable the organist (if he or she so desires) to play a simple accompaniment for the brief soprano/alto duet; to feature a tenor "solo" in the fourth verse; and to express the "union...and perfect harmony" indicated in the text of the fifth verse..

 
#181 Jesus of Nazareth, Savior and King.

#181 Jesus of Nazareth, Savior and King

This setting can enhance the worshiper's thoughts and emotions before and during the singing of this sacramental hymn. Use it as an introduction or as a last-verse accompaniment to encourage sacred meditation. The gently moving quarter notes at phrase endings direct the singers onward and encourage them to exert more energy for the longer notes.

#181 Jesus of Nazareth, Savior and King - Mike Carson
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#182 We'll Sing All Hail to Jesus' Name.
#182 We'll Sing All Hail to Jesus' Name - Mike Carson
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#182 We'll Sing All Hail to Jesus' Name

FUGHETTA

Karen Lynn Davidson attributes this hymn as one that "perhaps more beautifully than any other sacrament hymn..., focuses on the Savior's triumph over sin and death." This hymn affords its singers the opportunity to offer praises for the Atonement.

 

This "fughetta" setting is useful in worship services as a reverent offertory or as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn. A melodic fragment, heard alone, may make a particular impression, but when it is heard simultaneously with other melodic ideas or combined in unexpected ways with itself, as in a canon or fugue, surprising new facets of meaning are revealed to the listener as more profound than a merely pleasing melody.

 
#184 Upon the Cross of Calvary FUGHETTA.

#184 Upon the Cross of Calvary

Because this hymn is short and only contains three verses, this "fughetta" setting is useful as a solemn introduction to the singing of the hymn and a reverent offertory after its conclusion while the sacramental bread is finished being broken.

#184 Upon the Cross of Calvary - Mike Carson
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God Loved Us, So He Sent His Son - Mike Carson
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#187 God Loved Us, So He Sent His Son

Karen Lynn Davidson writes: "If we had only the first line of this hymn, we would have an eloquent sermon on the meaning of the sacrament and the Atonement." The text focuses on the Savior's missions of atonement, teaching, and showing by example. It emphasizes our responsibility to repay God's abiding love through bending our will to His.

This is a chorale-style hymn. The fermatas indicate the ending of each phrase; they do not necessarily mean to hold "at will." A full beat on each half note,  followed by another full beat for a breath, is sufficient. Directors would do well to conduct each fermata measure in the three-beat pattern. 

 
#189 O Thou, Before the World Began.png

#189 O Thou, Before the World Began

The earthly mission of Jesus Christ was part of an eternal plan, established before our earth was created, to ensure the resurrection and redemption of mankind. This belief is central to the restored gospel's perception of the Savior's sacrifice, which continues anew; it is efficacious for all time.

This is a sacramental hymn and should be played in a prayerful manner. Consider a "modified" flute chorus with an 8' flute, 4' principal, and a light 2' flute coupled from the swell. With this combination, an 8' principal and 16' subbass or bourdon are suitable for the pedal.

#189 O Thou, Before the World Began - Mike Carson
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#191 Behold the Great Redeemer Die.png
#191 Behold the Great Redeemer Die - Mike Carson
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#191 Behold the Great Redeemer Die

When the word Behold is used in hymns or holy writ without a comma following it, it means to "look," to "see." In this hymn we are asked to become eyewitnesses to the Savior's crucifixion, insults, and suffering. After the sorrow and grief of Christ's death have ended, the final verse of the hymn exclaims that "He lives–he lives!" Likewise, the final verse solely mentions the sacred symbols of the sacrament. Unfortunately, all too often the fifth and sixth verses are omitted. 

This hymnbellishment can be used as the introduction or as an accompaniment to one of the verses. It would work well for the fifth verse, followed by the sixth verse with a brighter organ registration to express the joy of the Savior's resurrection and the simplicity of partaking of the sacred symbols of the sacrament.

 
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#194 There Is a Green Hill Far Away - Mike Carson
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#194 There Is a Green Hill Far Away

"This hymn is a gentle and beautiful preparation for the sacrament. Rather than emphasizing the details of Christ's suffering, it reminds us that the Savior's love for us motivated His sacrifice; in return, our love for Him should motivate us as we reaffirm our commitment of obedience and service." Karen Lynn Davidson

This setting makes a lovely, extended introduction to the singing of the hymn or a quiet offertory at the conclusion of the hymn singing while the bread is finished being broken. If the organist does not need the additional measures at the end, they may be omitted.

 
 
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#196 Jesus, Once of Humble Birth - Mike Carson
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#196 Jesus, Once of Humble Birth

By setting up a repeated "Once..., Now..." sequence, the author of this text structured a series of poetic contrasts. Once, the poverty, pain, and submissiveness of the Savior's life; and now, his sovereignty and power, and the miracle of his atonement and resurrection (Karen Lynn Davidson).

This setting is useful as a contemplative introduction to the singing of the hymn, an offertory during the breaking of the bread, or as a poignant accompaniment for the third verse. Note the low "D" in the second measure of the pedal part; it is notated here to emphasize the word "groaned" in "Once he groaned..." at the beginning of the third verse. 

 
#200 Christ the Lord Is Risen Today.png

#200 Christ the Lord Is Risen Today

This hymn is most likely the favorite Easter hymn of the Latter-day Saints. With exultation and many Alleluias, it encapsulates the redeeming work of the triumphant Savior over the sting of death and the victory of the grave. It invites all to joyfully raise their voices high in reply to the angel choirs.

If used for congregational singing, it is intended as an accompaniment for unison singing on the final verse. 

#200 Christ the Lord Is Risen Today - Mike Carson
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#201 Joy to the World_0001.png

#201 Joy to the World

"Joy to the World" was intended by its writer to be a millennial hymn, but is used by the Christian world today mainly as a Christmas carol. This organ setting, with a principle chorus organ registration, including mixtures and reeds, will joyfully lift heavy hearts and edify weary souls, when sung in a December worship service.

#201 Joy to the World - Mike Carson
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#202 Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful

This carol is my favorite for the opening hymn on Christmas morning, or the closest Sunday to Christmas Day. This setting is intended as an accompaniment for unison singing on the final verse. 

Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful - Mike Carson
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#203 Angels We Have Heard on High - Mike Carson
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#203 Angels We Have Heard on High

This traditional French Christmas carol tells the story of the angels' appearance to the shepherds in the fields of Bethlehem. No one knows the date of the carol's origin, its author, its composer, or the translator of our English version.

Singers of this delightful carol are charmed by the intimate narrative of the angels and the shepherds. The harmonically engaging chorus uses the Latin translation of the words of the angels: "Gloria in excelsis Deo" (Glo-dee-ah een ex Chel seese Deh o), which means "Glory to God in the highest." Use this hymnbellishment with a bright registration and a reed in the pedal for solid clarity on the final verse.

 
#204 Silent Night ORGAN SOLO OR ACCOMPAN

#204 Silent Night

This setting features an introduction with verse one in the traditional four-part setting, verse two with a composed tenor line for soloing out, an interlude, and a final verse with a "free" harmonic accompaniment, which requires the congregation to sing the melody in unison. Verses one and two can be sung in four parts. Fingering, pedaling, and registration suggestions are also included.

#204 Silent Night - Mike Carson
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#206 Away in a Manger_0001.png

#206 Away in a Manger

This famous Christmas carol is enjoyed by children and adults alike. The simple yet dignified hymn tune by William J. Kirkpatrick has been modified here so that the organist can play the second-verse melody in the tenor range, thus exuding the lowing of the cattle and the baby awaking in the darkness. For the third verse a simple accompaniment is provided without pedal to suggest the gentle prayer of a frightened child, asking for the Lord Jesus to "stay by my cradle till morning is nigh."

#206 Away in a Manger - Mike Carson
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#209 Hark! the Herald Angels Sing

"This favorite Christmas carol is an invitation to all people to join with the angels in their joyous song: Glory to the newborn King!" -Karen Lynn Davidson.

This hymnbellishment is intended for use as a final-verse accompaniment for unison singing. It may also be used effectively for a postlude to a Christmas service or program.

#209 Hark! the Herald Angels Sing - Mike Carson
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