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#1 The Morning Breaks

The premier hymn in this collection is a bold declaration of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, which promises light to a world in spiritual darkness. Included in the download are two versions. First, an accompaniment for the final verse, and second, a modified version that harmonizes the unique tenor/bass and treble duet phrases.

#1 The Morning Breaks - Mike Carson
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#2 The Spirit of God

"Because it is so closely tied with important events in Church history, and because it is part of such joyful occasions as temple dedications in our own day, "The Spirit of God" is one of the most significant and beloved hymns in the hymn tradition of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It truly affords an opportunity to sing and shout "with the armies of heaven." Karen Lynn Davidson

The pedal line in this hymnbellishment encourages a forward, marching movement, which aptly reflects the spirit of this hymn.

#2 The Spirit of God - Mike Carson
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#3 Now Let Us Rejoice - Mike Carson
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#3 Now Let Us Rejoice

"'Now Let Us Rejoice' came out of a grave situation in the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a situation in 1833 of defeat, frustration, homelessness, suffering, privation, and hunger. But even these hardships produced a hymn that still gives hope and sustenance to [millions] who live in better times." George D. Pyper

 

This hymnbellishment features harmonic changes that will be more effective if the accompanied verse is sung in unison. Use part of it for the introduction and/or all of it for the singing of the final verse. The long pedal points, walking pedal lines, and frequent harmonic changes are more effective with a broadened tempo.

 
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#4 Truth Eternal

"This hymn honors the power of truth. Truth will liberate, enlighten, and save" Karen Lynn Davidson.

Due to the facts that this hymn is a little less known and so short, enjoy playing all of this setting as the introduction and again to accompany the final verse in unison.

#4 Truth Eternal - Mike Carson
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#5 High on the Mountain Top - Mike Carson
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#5 High on the Mountain Top

"And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the Lord's house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills: and all nations shall flow unto it" Isaiah 2:2.

This hymnbellishment can be used effectively with unison singing or with the traditional four-part harmonies. As with most last-verse accompaniments with long pedal points, walking pedal lines, and frequent harmonic changes, it is more effective to broaden the tempo a bit. With the download a second version is included that can be used as the introduction or for a different verse.

 
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#6 Redeemer of Israel - Mike Carson
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#6 Redeemer of Israel

"The six verses of this hymn affirm many facets of the Savior's mission and personality. The vigorous words praise the Savior first as our invincible redeemer, then as our shepherd and protector, then as the millenial Messiah. The sixth verse is an ecstatic vision of his heavenly glory" Karen Lynn Davidson.

​This setting can be used as an introduction to the hymn and as an accompaniment for the final verse. Too often music directors end before singing the prayerful fifth verse and the praising sixth verse, omitting references to the soul-cheering comfort and hope that the Savior imparts and the rejoicing of ten thousand angels, as myriads wait for His word!

 
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#9 Come, Rejoice

"Come, Rejoice" is a Christ-centered celebration of the restoration of the gospel. Jesus has spoken again in the latter days to gladden the hearts of his followers and gather them to him." Karen Lynn Davidson

The four-part version here is taken from the 1950 hymnal and expanded with harmonic and melodic movement at the phrase endings and a pedal point on the third line.

#9 Come, Rejoice! - Mike Carson
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#13 An Angel from on High

"'An Angel from on High' belongs distinctively to the hymnology of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is a song of the Restoration---a revelation of a divine truth...." George D. Pyper in Stories of Latter-day Saint Hymns

Written at the request of an organist friend, this hymnbellishment will elevate the singing of the final verse. Please consider singing all five verses!

#13 An Angel from on High - Mike Carson
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#14 Sweet Is the Peace the Gospel Brings

#14 Sweet Is the Peace the Gospel Brings

"Latter-day Saints understand the truth of this hymn's message. Without hesitation we welcome a hymn that exalts reason, thoughtful seeking, and the role of human beings in the divine plan; we have total trust in the intellectual completeness as well as the spiritual completeness of the gospel.... CACHE first appeared in Hymns (1948); the text has been part of Latter-day Saint tradition since it was first printed in the Millennial Star in 1852" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This two-page setting provides assorted components to facilitate singing all seven verses: an introduction, the complete hymn, four varied verse endings with optional interludes, and an embellishment with coda for the final verse!

#14 Sweet Is the Peace the Gospel Brings - Mike Carson
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#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet.

#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet

"It cannot be called the greatest hymn ever written.... In fact, it does not compare in literary merit or poetic beauty with many of the other gems contained in our hymn books; but...it is exclusively a Latter-day Saint hymn; a Mormon heart-throb; a song of the Restoration" George D. Pyper.

​This is a reharmonization for unison singing on the last verse. The organist may play the last two lines as an "interlude" as a way of slowing down the tempo in preparation for a broader, more deliberate tempo for the last verse. 

#19 We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet - Mike Carson
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#21 Come, Listen to a Prophet's Voice

This little hymnbellishment can be used at the end of the introduction for a more interesting harmony to the otherwise mundane repeated notes. Also use it at the end of the fourth verse for the same reason and to end the hymn with a feeling of completion and resolve.

#21 Come, Listen to a Prophet's Voice - Mike Carson
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#25 Now We'll Sing with One Accord

The events referred to in this hymn---the restoration of the gospel, the receiving of the priesthood, and the translation of the Book of Mormon---honor the Prophet Joseph Smith.

This accompaniment was written to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Prophet's First Vision in the spring of 1820.

#25 Now We'll Sing with One Accord - Mike Carson
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#26 Joseph Smith's First Prayer

This hymn depicts the First Vision of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It provides the essential facts of the moving account of the events leading up to and including the vision of the Father and the Son. 

This setting can be used as an introduction and/or an accompaniment to the singing of the hymn, being especially effective on the final verse to provide an audible impression of the remarkable words spoken by the Father: "Joseph, this is my Beloved; hear Him."

#26 Joseph Smith's First Prayer - Mike Carson
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#27 Praise to the Man - Mike Carson
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#27 Praise to the Man

"Soon after the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, William W. Phelps, in an expression of grief and admiration for his close associate who had been so cruelly martyred, wrote "Praise to the Man." The words he penned as a personal tribute reflect the feelings of millions of Saints" Karen Lynn Davidson.

​This setting provides an introduction, interlude, and final-verse accompaniment, which allows for four-part singing and the option of soloing out the tenor line, preferably on a bright reed combination. The introduction mimics the sound of Scottish bagpipes.

 
 
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#36 They, the Builders of the Nation

"This hymn highlights the role of the pioneers as an example and a model for those who followed them. Their deeds not only tamed the wilderness and built cities but also provided 'stepping-stones for generations,' a path for their children and grandchildren to admire and follow..." Karen Lynn Davidson

Simple, yet effective. Useful as a final verse accompaniment, sung in unison. If the organist plays from the hymnal and then reverts to the hymnbellishment on the third line, it can be sung in harmony.

#36 They, the Builders of the Nation - Mike Carson
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#41 Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise

This setting can be used with good effect for the last verse of the hymn. The five unison notes at the beginning of the first, second, and fourth lines are harmonized, and the pedal point on the third line creates a sense of urgency to return to the tonic. All in all it will elevate the message and edify the singers as they sing this glorious hymn.

#41 Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise - Mike Carson
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#43 Zion Stands with Hills Surrounded

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints love this hymn and its promise of safety and security in "Zion, kept by power divine." The text, written by a man who probably never heard of the Church during his lifetime, is completely in tune with Latter-day Saint feelings. Play this hymn at a dignified tempo, using lush foundational stops 8' and 4'. The thick, five-part harmonies of this setting create a full and pleasing sound.

#43 Zion Stands with Hills Surrounded - Mike Carson
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#44 Beautiful Zion, Built Above

In collaboration with Rebecca Brand, we have created an accompaniment for the final verse of this very singable and well-loved gospel-style hymn. It can be used with good effect to elevate the message and edify the congregation.

#44 Beautiful Zion, Built Above - Mike Carson
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#58 Come, Ye Children of the Lord

Considered by many to be of highest exaltation and musical worship, this hymn contemplates the events of the Savior's second coming and the anticipation of that day when we will shout and sing in celebration of the time of love and beauty, when earth is cleansed from sin.

This setting is to be used as a last-verse accompaniment with full organ.

#58 Come, Ye Children of the Lord - Mike Carson
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#59 Come, O Thou King of Kings

This vigorous millennial hymn text by Parley P. Pratt is a fervent cry to the God of Israel to come and set His people free. No doubt written during a time of great trials for the early Saints, it looked to the day when all the ransomed throng would join in singing a new triumphant song, filling the heavens with anthems from Zion's Hill.

With the steady stepwise motion of the pedal and the added harmonic and rhythmic movement between the phrases, this setting can give the last verse an edifying lift.

#59 Come, O Thou King of Kings - Mike Carson
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#60 Battle Hymn of the Republic

The words to this famous hymn link patriotic heroism with the heroism of our Savior and Redeemer, Jesus Christ. It points toward a jubilant millennial return of the Lord.

Use this joyful hymnbellishment as an accompaniment to the singing of the second verse ("He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat") and the last chorus—resolutely!

#60 Battle Hymn of the Republic - Mike Carson
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#62 All Creatures of Our God and King

This magnificent hymn should be led with close adherence to the tempo suggestions, allowing the congregation adequate breath to sing the phrases exultantly, particularly the last "Alleluia!"

This final-verse setting will add depth and gravity to unison or part singing. An introduction is also provided.

#62 All Creatures of Our God and King - Mike Carson
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#66 Rejoice, the Lord Is King!

Described by J. Spencer Cornwall as "heroic in character and . . . sequentially climactic" in melody and text, this hymn is an exultant celebration of the Savior's many names and attributes: Lord, King, Savior, Christ, and "the God of truth and love"!

This setting provides a harmonic background to the three small sections that are solely unison, and features long, low pedal points, which emphasize the triumphant text: "His kingdom cannot fail."

#66 Rejoice, the Lord Is King! - Mike Carson
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#67 Glory to God on High

This dignified hymn unites the praises of heaven and earth. It is a simple poetic adaptation of Revelation 5:9-13, wherein John the Revelator sees and hears "a new song:" Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. Use the hymnbellishment as a joyful introduction or accompaniment for the final verse. The tune name, ITALIAN HYMN, honors the nationality of the composer. First published in 1761, the tune is included in most Christian hymnals. It is perfect for the Easter season!

#67 Glory to God on High - Mike Carson
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#68 A Mighty Fortress Is Our God

"This beloved and historic hymn arose out of the struggle of the Protestant Reformation.... It takes its inspiration from Psalm 46, which begins, 'God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.'...Its popularity extends throughout the Christian world" Karen Lynn Davidson.

Use this setting as the introduction and/or an accompaniment for the singing of the hymn. It would also make a stately postlude.

#68 A Mighty Fortress Is Our God - Mike Carson
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#69 All Glory, Laud, and Honor

This stately hymn is more than eleven hundred years old. Theodulph, bishop of Orleans, wrote the hymn in 820 A.D. to be used as a processional hymn on Palm Sunday, the Sunday before Easter, when many denominations celebrate Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

#69 All Glory, Laud, and Honor - Mike Carson
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#72 Praise to the Lord, the Almighty

This hymn's purpose is to praise the Lord for his many blessings, too numerous and too great to name or describe adequately. The spirit and imagery of the psalms permeate this hymn text.

For best effect, use this stately setting to accompany the singing of the last verse, with the congregation singing the melody in unison.

#72 Praise to the Lord, the Almighty - Mike Carson
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#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty H
#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand - Mike Carson
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#78 God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand

This stirring hymn praises the majesty of God and addresses Him in mighty prayer, pleading for His guidance and protection in preserving our nation. The text expresses patriotic feelings, but is appropriate for any occasion. The fourth verse, which is not printed in the Latter-day Saint hymnal, states:

Refresh thy people on their toilsome way,

Lead us from night to never-ending day;

Fill all our lives with love and grace divine,

And glory, laud, and praise be ever thine.

The opening fanfare is dramatically reharmonized, and, when sung with the omitted fourth verse, the marching bass line suggests a people being led and refreshed "on their toilsome way," reminiscent of the Pioneers. Singers can comfortably sing the four-part harmonies in the hymnal.

 
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#85 How Firm a Foundation - Mike Carson
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#85 How Firm a Foundation

The words of this bold, vigorous hymn express our absolute faith in the saving and protecting power of Jesus Christ. The text is unique in that the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th verses speak as from the the Lord to his followers. The 1st, 2nd, and 7th verses speak as from a narrator, or one who is very firm in their faith of the Savior. Thus, this setting presents varied options for singing all seven verses.

     The audio recording demonstrates the introduction and the third, fourth, fifth and seventh verses with interludes. Watch for the altered syllable placements in the 2nd, 5th, and 6th verses. Note the suggested tempo range with two beats per measure and the broadening of the 7th verse in four beats.

 
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#86 How Great Thou Art - Mike Carson
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#86 How Great Thou Art

This hymn was popularized by Billy Graham in his tours of Britain and North America in the 1950s. By 1974 it had become, according to a poll among readers of the Christian Herald magazine, the most popular hymn in America. In 1985 it appeared in Hymns of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Whenever I sang or played "How Great Thou Art" in a church service, I always felt it needed more movement in the accompaniment. Thus, this version for organ was born when it was chosen as a congregational hymn in a funeral for which I was asked to play.

I've also included a bonus setting in the download to use as an optional introduction or an alternate version for the refrain.

 
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#87 God Is Love - Mike Carson
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#87 God Is Love

This hymn's message is that the earth and its beauties and joys are a constant reminder of the goodness and love of the Creator. "The voice of His creations declares His divinity.... If [mankind] fails to converse with their Creator in plain words, at least they are obligated to hear the voice of Nature, which is also the voice of God" (Bruce R. McConkie).

This hymnbellishment is intended for accompanying unison congregational singing on the final verse. Beginning on the third staff the organ rises above the melody, so a strong director or choir should lead the way.

 
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#89 The Lord Is My Light - Mike Carson
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#89 The Lord Is My Light

"I've never liked this hymn," was a student's comment at a lesson to prepare this hymn for a sacrament service on the upcoming Sunday. I agreed that the value of "The Lord Is My Light" depends more on the significance of its message than on its musical worth. However, when the verses are sung at a slightly slower tempo to allow for all of the words to be sung comfortably, and then when the chorus's tempo is faster, it is much more enjoyable to sing! After I explained the tempo suggestions and wrote this hymnbellishment for her to use in the service, she admitted, "You're going to make me like this hymn now, aren't you?!"

 
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#92 For the Beauty of the Earth

This joyful hymn recalls to our minds the importance of being aware of the simple beauties of nature, family, and friendship. While naming many sources of joy, it gives us an opportunity to renew our appreciation for our blessings and to offer thanks to the Lord at the end of each verse.

This hymnbellishment provides an exuberant introduction to the singing of the hymn and an exciting accompaniment for the final verse.

#92 For the Beauty of the Earth - Mike Carson
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#93 Prayer of Thanksgiving

In America, "Prayer of Thanksgiving" (often known by its first line, "We gather together to ask the Lord's blessing") is a traditional Thanksgiving hymn. The tune, a Dutch folk melody, takes its name from a Viennese choirmaster named Edward Kremser, who published the melody in a collection of Dutch folk songs that he had arranged for male chorus. Karen Lynn Davidson

For congregational singing, use a bright, full chorus registration with a reed added to the pedal.

#93 Prayer of Thanksgiving - Mike Carson
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#94 Come, Ye Thankful People

During the Thanksgiving holiday season, the time when this hymn is usually sung, we reflect thoughtfully and joyfully upon our blessings. This hymn gives us an opportunity to recognize and praise the generous goodness of our Heavenly Father.

Again, as in hymn #93, use a bright, full chorus registration with a reed in the pedal for optimum effect in congregational singing.

#94 Come, Ye Thankful People - Mike Carson
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#95 Now Thank We All Our God

This stately and moving hymn has been incorporated by Johann Sebastian Bach and other composers into their works. The tune name comes from the first line of the original German text: "Nun danket alle Gott." In addition to its use at Thanksgiving, the hymn is also used in many countries to mark important national occasions and celebrations.

The setting presented here is intended for accompaniment to the singing of the hymn in unison. It would also make a dignified postlude. 

#95 Now Thank We All Our God - Mike Carson
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#96 Dearest Children, God Is Near You.pn

#96 Dearest Children, God Is Near You

"This hymn directed at children has a message for all who seek to do right: Blessings, happiness, and the instructive companionship of the Holy Ghost come through doing what is right. The final words of verse two could be a motto for all, young and old alike: "Cherish virtue! God will bless the pure in heart" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This "warm, fuzzy" setting is perfect as an introduction, last-verse accompaniment, and/or a fervent postlude at the end of a meeting.

#96 Dearest Children, God Is Near You - Mike Carson
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#98 I Need Thee Every Hour

"This hymn strikes a meaningful chord among Latter-day Saints in its humble pleading for the constant presence of the Savior. In this hymn we petition Him repeatedly to be with us, not just in times of trial nor just on special spiritual occasions, but every hour" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This setting can be played ensemble style (both hands on the same manual) for every verse. The harmonies fit nicely with four-part singing. On the last verse the tenor line may be soloed out at pitch or an octave higher, depending on the solo registration that is chosen.

#98 I Need Thee Every Hour - Mike Carson
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#100 Nearer, My God, to Thee

"More than one-third of the words of this hymn consist of a repeated phrase of longing, stated in the title.... It is an emotional outpouring of a desire to be more closely united with the Father and His angelic hosts in both life and death (Karen Lynn Davidson). Much of the imagery in the text can be better understood by recalling the story of Jacob's dream-vision, as related in Genesis 28:10-22.

Use the first four measures and the last four measures as the hymn introduction, and play it in its entirety for the singing of the third verse.

#100 Nearer, My God, to Thee - Mike Carson
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#103 Precious Savior, Dear Redeemer

This hymn is especially powerful as an opening hymn in a worship service or as an invocation of the Spirit in a family or personal setting. The gentle, triple meter entreats calmness and serenity. The dotted rhythm should be slightly "relaxed" to aid in singing the peaceful prayer.

The setting here is for a second verse accompaniment in hymn singing or as a contrasting texture in a prelude.

#103 Precious Savior, Dear Redeemer - Mike Carson
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#106 God Speed the Right

Use this hymnbellishment as a last-verse accompaniment for unison singing to emphasize the steady, rhythmic tune and to express the patience, firmness, and perseverance that are ours as this hymn is sung. The unison voicing of the original is harmonized for strong effect. Use full organ with a 16' reed in the pedal. Enjoy!

#106 God Speed the Right - Mike Carson
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#113 Our Savior's Love

"The culmination of this quiet and elegant hymn is a reverent prayer to the Father. Verses one and two, as they unfold toward that prayer, speak of the gentle warmth of the Savior's guiding love and of the Holy Spirit's 'voice of goodnes'" Karen Lynn Davidson.

This is a lush setting of an already lush hymn. Enjoy it as a prelude, voluntary, hymn introduction, or accompaniment for the final verse. As a bonus, the download includes a version that modulates a whole step lower for more comfortable unison singing.

#113 Our Savior's Love - Mike Carson
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#116 Come, Follow Me

This Christ-centered hymn is a favorite of most Latter-day Saints. Its message is unique: If we emulate the Savior in this earthly life, we will have the opportunity to continue on the path of discipleship and acquire even more of His attributes in the life to come. If verse five is omitted, this thought is not complete. Verse six itemizes the gifts and blessings of obeying His words, "Come, follow me." Use this hymnbellishment to emphasize the grandeur of the final verse.

#116 Come, Follow Me - Mike Carson
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#117 Come unto Jesus

Jesus's invitation, "Come unto me," includes everyone who is burdened with cares or oppressed by sin. He made it open and free for all: the weak, the fearful, the hesitant. He beckons to those from every nation and isle, to the high and lowly in station. Ever he calls, "Come to me"!

This pastorale setting is useful as an introduction to the singing of the hymn, an accompaniment to one of the verses, or as an organ voluntary during the worship service.

#117 Come unto Jesus - Mike Carson
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#125 How Gentle God's Commands

"Those who obey the Lord find their load lighter, not heavier. This is the paradox of obedience: If we seek obedience rather than happiness, the result is happiness after all" Karen Lynn Davidson. "The undulating flowing melody of this tune is beautifully in harmony with the text, although the two were not associated when the composition was written" J. Spencer Cornwall.

This setting with the right hand played an octave lower is for verse three: "Why should this anxious load / Press down your weary mind...?" It can also be played with the right hand at pitch for the optimistic fourth verse.

#125 How Gentle God's Commands - Mike Carson
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#129 Where Can I Turn for Peace?

"The honest and touching words of this hymn can help in difficult moments---first, because they help us realize that all men and women experience such moments, and second, because they remind us of the ultimate source of comfort and solace." Karen Lynn Davidson

Written for a stake conference adult session, this hymnbellishment (or part of it) may be used to introduce the hymn, or, in its entirety, to accompany the last verse.

#129 Where Can I Turn for Peace? - Mike Carson
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